Pope Francis’ post-synodal apostolic exhortation, Christus Vivit – Christ is Alive! Is now available to order from the Catholic Truth Society (CTS).

The document is the fruit of six months of prayer and reflection on the conclusions of last autumn’s Synod on Young People.

The Holy Father has produced a direct and heartfelt appeal, addressing himself both to young people and to the entire church, placing before us the figure of Christ, “the true youthfulness of a World Grown Old.”

The CTS is dispatching thousands of copies around the UK and Ireland to fulfil pre-orders.

A spokesman said: “Christus Vivit is a watershed moment in the Church’s ministry to young people.

“It will become a handbook for all priests, catechists and teachers who are charged with the vital mission of evangelising and handing on the faith to young people.

“With this direct, down-to-earth exhortation, the Holy Father is calling the entire church to re-evaluate our approach to accompanying the journeys of young Christians, seeing them not simply as ‘the future’ but as the ‘Now of God’ – brothers and sisters who face unique and unprecedented challenges in living their faith in an ever more secular world.

“The CTS, is, as always, honoured to be able to provide this service to the Holy Father and the Church in the UK and Ireland.”

Christus Vivit – Christ Is Alive! By Pope Francis can be ordered from ctsbooks.org/christus-vivit priced £5.95.

Twelve key quotes from the Pope’s new Exhortation…

Jesus had no use for adults who looked down on the young or lorded it over them. On the contrary, he insisted that “the greatest among you must become like the youngest.

It is unhelpful to buy into the cult of youth or foolishly to dismiss others simply because they are older or from another generation. Jesus tells us that the wise are able to bring forth from their store things both new and old (cf. Mt 13:52). A wise young person is open to the future, yet still capable of learning something from the experience of others.

It is important to realize that Jesus was a young person. He gave his life when he was, in today’s terms, a young adult.

Let us ask the Lord to free the Church from those who would make her grow old, encase her in the past, hold her back or keep her at a standstill. But let us also ask him to free her from another temptation: that of thinking she is young because she accepts everything the world offers her, thinking that she is renewed because she sets her message aside and acts like everybody else.

The Church should not be excessively caught up in herself but instead, and above all, reflect Jesus Christ. This means humbly acknowledging that some things concretely need to change, and if that is to happen, she needs to appreciate the vision but also the criticisms of young people.

Our present-day culture exploits the image of the young. Beauty is associated with a youthful appearance, cosmetic treatments that hide the traces of time. Young bodies are constantly advertised as a means of selling products. The ideal of beauty is youth, but we need to realize that this has very little to do with young people. It only means that adults want to snatch youth for themselves, not that they respect, love and care for young people.

If you are young in years, but feel weak, weary or disillusioned, ask Jesus to renew you. With him, hope never fails. You can do the same if you feel overwhelmed by vices, bad habits, selfishness or unhealthy pastimes. Jesus, brimming with life, wants to help you make your youth worthwhile. In this way, you will not deprive the world of the contribution that you alone can make, in all your uniqueness and originality.

Dear young people, make the most of these years of your youth. Don’t observe life from a balcony. Don’t confuse happiness with an armchair, or live your life behind a screen. Whatever you do, do not become the sorry sight of an abandoned vehicle! Don’t be parked cars, but dream freely and make good decisions. Take risks, even if it means making mistakes. Don’t go through life anaesthetized or approach the world like tourists. Make a ruckus! Cast out the fears that paralyze you, so that you don’t become young mummies. Live! Give yourselves over to the best of life! Open the door of the cage, go out and fly! Please, don’t take early retirement.

At every moment in life, we can renew our youthfulness. When I began my ministry as Pope, the Lord broadened my horizons and granted me renewed youth. The same thing can happen to a couple married for many years, or to a monk in his monastery. There are things we need to “let go of ” as the years pass, but growth in maturity can coexist with a fire constantly rekindled, with a heart ever young.

Youth ministry, as traditionally carried out, has been significantly affected by social and cultural changes. Young people frequently fail to find in our usual programmes a response to their concerns, their needs, their problems and issues… we should take into greater consideration those practices that have shown their value – the methods, language and aims that have proved truly effective in bringing young people to Christ and the Church. It does not matter where they are coming from or what labels they have received, whether “conservative” or “liberal”, “traditional” or “progressive”. What is important is that we make use of everything that has borne good fruit and effectively communicates the joy of the Gospel.

Rather than being too concerned with communicating a great deal of doctrine, let us first try to awaken and consolidate the great experiences that sustain the Christian life. In the words of Romano Guardini, “when we experience a great love… everything else becomes part of it”.

Many young people have come to appreciate silence and closeness to God. Groups that gather to adore the Blessed Sacrament or to pray with the word of God have also increased. We should never underestimate the ability of young people to be open to contemplative prayer.

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